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CNET Road show video
#11
(04-22-2017, 03:48 PM)Lotus Wrote: Is the motor a prototype, chinese maybe ? Will the production model be with a different motor?

The motor is an AC synchronous motor. It's pretty quiet. There are no gears I believe.
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#12
(04-23-2017, 03:02 AM)Rickb Wrote: The SOLO is an enclosed motorcycle with a small space cabin not a luxury car.

In Canada, Solo is not a motorcycle. The driver does not sit astride the engine, and Solo has a steering wheel not handlebars, for instance. I think it will be classified as a three-wheeled vehicle. The driver's space may be smaller than the usual passenger-car but the storage space is pretty good if not contiguous.


enclosed motorcycle means a motorcycle that
  • (a) has steering handlebars that are completely constrained from rotating in relation to the axle of only one wheel in contact with the ground,
  • (b) is designed to travel on two wheels in contact with the ground,
  • © has a minimum driver’s seat height, when the vehicle is unladen, of 650 mm, and
  • (d) has a structure partially or fully enclosing the driver and passenger that is an integral part of the vehicle chassis; (motocyclette à habitacle fermé)
motorcycle means a vehicle that is of the subclasses enclosed motorcycle, open motorcycle, limited-speed motorcycle or motor tricycle, and

    (a) is designed to travel on not more than three wheels in contact with the ground,
    (b) has a minimum wheel rim diameter of 250 mm, and
    © has a minimum wheelbase of 1 016 mm,

motor tricycle means a motorcycle, other than an antique reproduction vehicle, that
  • (a) is designed to travel on three wheels that are in contact with the ground and symmetrically arranged in relation to the longitudinal median plane,
  • (b) has seating on which the driver and passenger must sit astride,
  • © has not more than four designated seating positions,
  • (d) has a GVWR of 1 000 kg or less,
  • (e) has a maximum speed of more than 70 km/h, and
  • (f) does not have a structure partially or fully enclosing the driver and passenger, other than that part of the vehicle forward of the driver’s torso and the seat backrest; (tricycle à moteur)

   three-wheeled vehicle means a vehicle, other than a competition vehicle, an antique reproduction vehicle, a motorcycle, a restricted-use motorcycle, a trailer or a vehicle imported temporarily for special purposes, that

        (a) is designed to travel on three wheels in contact with the ground,
        (b) has no more than four designated seating positions, and
        © has a GVWR of 1 000 kg or less; (véhicule à trois roues)"

See Motor Vehicle Safety Regulations

Schedule III contains the matrix of safety requirements for three-wheeled vehicles.
[url=http://lois-laws.justice.gc.ca/eng/regulations/C.R.C.,_c._1038/FullText.html][/url]
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#13
I can understand the sound issue. I took a 400 mile trip in a Volt yesterday, and the motor noise is quite noticeable, especially decelerating as I presume what I heard was the regen kicking in. The sad part was that after fully charging overnight (with a charging station) this 2 year old car could go exactly 28 miles on a full charge. The rest was numerous gas stops as the tank is only 10 gallons and the gas mileage was terrible. I could have done much better using my minivan.
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#14
(04-26-2017, 08:38 AM)Hog Wrote: The sad part was that after fully charging overnight (with a charging station) this 2 year old car could go exactly 28 miles on a full charge. The rest was numerous gas stops as the tank is only 10 gallons and the gas mileage was terrible.

That's what I would expect from excessive speed. EVs are very sensitive to speed as the greatest waste of energy is pushing air out of the way. At 70 km/h (43 mph) drag is about half what it is at 100 km/h (62 mph). You get the same effect for an ICE at high rpm or an ICEd vehicle at high speeds. There the internal drags (viscosity of lubricants, resistance to flow of air/exhaust, and transmission losses) in the engine come into play. For whatever reasons, some people like to drive 70-80 mph and complain about differences from EPA ratings which are at an average speed of 48.3 mph with a maximum of 60 mph in a test run. Drag at 48 mph is only 1/3 of the drag at 80 mph.
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#15
Perfectly understandable regarding the speed, however this notification appeared the minute we left the driveway. How would it know how fast we were going to go? We didnt get up to highway speeds for at least 10 miles. As for fuel, yes 3 fills at 10 gallons each, one to start off as it had only a few gallons left, although I presume it didnt use any until the charge ran out. The trip was 224 miles each way, so about 15 mpg, 95% on gas.
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#16
(04-26-2017, 01:14 PM)Hog Wrote: Perfectly understandable regarding the speed, however this notification appeared the minute we left the driveway. How would it know how fast we were going to go? We didnt get up to highway speeds for at least 10 miles. As for fuel, yes 3 fills at 10 gallons each, one to start off as it had only a few gallons left, although I presume it didnt use any until the charge ran out. The trip was 224 miles each way, so about 15 mpg, 95% on gas.

Well, I am a bit confused by your surprise; it worked pretty much as advertized : it's all-electric for short jaunts and a gasmobile for road trips. The Volt's all-electric range with fully charged batteries varies from 25 to 50 miles depending on terrain, driving technique, and temperature ...
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#17
I thought the range was at least in the hundred mile or so zone, but I do not follow EVs, so I am relatively ignorant on this subject. At that range, it is hardly worth having one if your commute exceeds a dozen miles or so, and you cannot even get to a town or highway around here with that. For some reason our business has two, which they use for regular commutes to NYC, a good 150 mile round trip. I guess it is more for marketing.. (Look, we are being green, and using a ton of gas....)
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#18
Yeah, the Volt is basically so that you can run on pure electric most of the time (around town), but can use it to drive 400 miles if you have to. I'll probably end up with a used Volt (or a plug-in hybrid Ioniq or Sonata or ...) when the gas-mobile croaks.
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#19
Well, I will have to disagree with those averages. As a statistician, I know you can 'average' anything you want, the reality may be quite different. Since the majority of the population resides in the urban centers, logically any 'average' will be weighted to their experience. Anyone who lives in the suburbs or bedroom communities will have a much longer commute. Average commute around here is 30-60 miles, and that may take you an hour to two hours, depending on traffic. Since the weight of the averages favors the urban areas, those are also the areas that need this car the least, as those areas are typically served by mass transit, Uber, Lyft, and Zipcar, and they discourage private vehicles due to space. So using the 'average commuter' argument may be flawed to some extent.
Around here, a 28 mile range would serve only to get you to the gas station and back.
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